Chris Martinez: Bringing Pinoy humor to life (Rappler.com)

Published in Rappler.com (August 13, 2012)

Photography by Cholo dela Vega. Grooming by Georginna Desuasido. | Rappler.com
Photography by Cholo dela Vega. Grooming by Georginna Desuasido. | Rappler.com

MANILA, Philippines – If you’ve seen or heard of the indie film Ang Babae sa Septic Tank (The Woman in the Septic Tank, 2011)Philippine cinema’s highest-grossing independent film to date, then you will have an idea of the kind of sensibility that it takes to capture a subject so irreverently yet so truthfully.

In the film, 3 film school graduates take on the lofty dream of producing an Oscar-worthy independent film about — what else? — poverty and prostitution in the Philippine slums (in this case, Payatas).

The film shows the young filmmakers experimenting with different treatments, exposing the tired old assumptions and formulas of Pinoy indie filmmaking.

It poked fun at the way the industry moved and looked at itself, and it made audiences laugh with recognition. It also made them think of the way Philippine art cinema kept on presenting itself to the world.

The film broke box-office records at the Cinemalaya Independent Film Festival and was later on bought by Star Cinema for a wider release. It became the most successful indie film in Philippine history, and won numerous awards for lead actress Eugene Domingo, director Marlon Rivera and screenwriter-producer Chris Martinez.

This is an excerpt only. To read the full post, visit the Rappler.com website, HERE.

Adolf Alix, Jr.: On loneliness and the cinematic experience (Rappler.com)

Published in Rappler.com (August 6, 2012)

DIREK ADOLF ALIX, JR. Photography by Cholo dela Vega. Grooming by Georginna Desuasido.
DIREK ADOLF ALIX, JR. Photography by Cholo dela Vega. Grooming by Georginna Desuasido.

MANILA, Philippines – Everyone goes through periods of loneliness.

It is a universal feeling — one that does not require a common language or culture to be understood.

In the case of Adolfo Alix, Jr., loneliness has become a subject of exploration and discovery, a theme that has allowed him to stretch the boundaries of filmmaking to see just how much he (and his audience) can discover.

“I read somewhere that one (feeling) that lingers the most is loneliness — sadness,” Alix shares. “I’m not a lonely person, I’m not a sad person; but I’ve realized that many of my films have an introspective quality about them.”

“I like to do films on themes that I’m not exactly familiar with,” he points out. “I like to experiment and try different milieus, different approaches.”

This is an excerpt only. To read the full article, visit the Rappler.com website, HERE.